Dispelling myths about being a vegetarian

There are many reasons for people to go vegan. It could be for the sake of eating preference, religious belief or environmental resources; you name it. However, in recent years, most people convert to a vegan out of consideration for their well-being. Even when you don’t do it all the way, building a diet in this direction still does good for your health.

For one thing, a vegetarian menu could bring great improvement to your health. In fact, being a vegan is said to increase your life span in addition to reducing risks of severe chronic diseases. Also, this practice is supported by the year round availability of fresh vegetables and other produces. Given all of the above mention, isn’t it safe to assume that vegetarian will soon catch on, become a trend and a lot more people will become vegetarian.


Actually, many people are not keen on being a vegan. They are discouraged mostly because of prevalent myths surrounding being a vegetarian. These myths will be unveiled as follows.

Dispelling myths about being a vegetarian

The first myth is that going without meat deprives you of the main source of protein, a nutrient that is essential for proper bodily functions, and plants alone is not enough to provide our body the needed amount of protein. This is not true because protein does not come from meat solely; it is present in other food as well (with the exception of alcohol and sugar). Half a cup of bean contains as much protein as an ounce of meat. In order to ensure sufficient intake of amino acids, you are recommended to include protein-rich vegetables such as beans, nuts, seeds, almonds and milk in your daily meal.

Another false belief is that for vegans, workout is difficult because they do not have enough energy to perform intensive exercises. If that is the case, then how come vegan athletes such as Lewis Hamilton and Venus Williams still manage to survive exhausting workouts and stay on top. The key lies in sensible food choice. Energy is often derived from vitamin B12, which can be found in not only meat but also in dairy products and iron-rich vegetables like spinach, beans and cashew.

Dispelling myths about being a vegetarian

For those who turn to a vegetarian routine in the hope of a slim figure, the weight-loss effect is not guaranteed. In fact, vegans come in many shapes and sizes, not all of whom are thin and slim. It’s wrong to assume that you could become slimmer by simply forgoing meat because meat is not the only factor that leads to weight gain. If you don’t eat meat but still consume a tidy quantity of processed food, then your wish of a desirable figure is not likely to be granted.

Dispelling myths about being a vegetarian

In addition, that a vegetarian is always hungry is fallacy. Should you be hungry while being on a vegetarian diet, do not hastily blame it on the diet because you might as well be short of fiber, fat or protein. Fat and protein prevent feeling of hunger because they are slow to digest. Similarly, because fiber is not broken down during digestion, it stays in your stomach, keeping it full. Therefore, keep a bag of nuts in your bag as a supply of protein, fat and fiber whenever you feel starving.

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